Pets and Their Sleeping Positions

The differences our pets have to one another is what makes us love and appreciate them as much as we do! Any pet parent knows that their four legged companions have their own set of preferences when it comes to all areas of their life. Just like humans, our pets have their favorite sleeping position and routine, but have you ever wondered why that is? Read below to find out what factors contribute to your pet’s favorite way of resting.

AGE

If you’ve had your pet since they were a puppy or kitten, you may reflect back on how they used to be more cuddly when you first brought them home. When our pets are young, it is harder for them to regulate their own body temperature which means they will oftentimes turn to their new mom or dad for warmth, but also for security. This is a very special time to bond with your pet and show them your presence is a safe space.

As our pets age, their bodies (especially their joints) may become more achy which leads them to needing more space to sprawl out and relax. This can be prevented by including hip and joint supplements into their daily diet at a young age. While this may not always be the case, it is important to watch out for any changes in your pet’s sleeping routine (especially if it is sudden) as this may be an early sign of a health condition that you should look into with your veterinarian.

Breed/Coat type

At Vetted, one thing we love to celebrate is the diversity of pets we share our lives with. There seems to be an endless array of breeds, sizes, and personality types – all of which play a part in what makes them choose their favorite spot to lay around on.

Our pets’ body temperatures are naturally higher than ours but especially those pets who have dense, double coated fur. While your pet may be insanely affectionate, it may not be comfortable for them to lounge on your couch or bed solely based on them getting overheated easily. On the other hand, pets with little to no fur may depend greatly on getting cozy with you and an array of plush fabric. This can vary from pet to pet but they typically know what is best and most comfortable for them so it’s best not to force them to a sleeping position one way or the other.

Certain breeds of dogs are also more comfortable when not physically close to their parents. This stems from wanting to protect their pack, therefore they position themselves at the entryway of your bedroom, in the hallway or on the landing of your stairs in order to do so. The funny thing is that this is their type of love language, so if your pet does not seem to want to be glued to you at all times, do not take it personally but rather thank them for doing what they believe is best.

Time of Year/Climate

Just like humans, our pets’ needs for achieving optimal comfort change depending on the temperature outside. You may have noticed your pet cannot get close enough to you during the winter but during the summer may prefer the comfort of a cold floor. If you notice that your pet is becoming overheated easily in your home, it may be time to consider getting a cooling mat or changing where their bed is in order to accommodate their needs. It is also important to never leave your pet’s bed or crate near a vent where they are unable to escape the heat or air conditioning. Our pets are pros at self regulating so just keep a watchful eye and they will enlighten you on their preferences.


In conclusion

As pet parents we strive to make our pets as comfortable as possible. Allowing them to lead the way and show you how they enjoy winding down is a process that may take some trial and error, however, it will lead to you both growing a deeper understanding and appreciation for one another. If you have major concerns as to your pet’s sleeping behavior you can always chat with our Pet Pros through the Vetted app who are here to hold your hand through the journey that is pet parenthood.

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